Are you sticking to your New Year’s Resolution ?

Hi Everyone,

It’s been a while since my last post due to a recent bout of illness (which I’m sure many of you can relate to at this time of year), as well as work and career development but now that’s all done and dusted, it’s time to get back on the fitness wagon.

So how many of you set a New Year’s Resolution at the start of this year? We are almost through February already :-o.

In today’s post we examine the most common New Year’s resolutions, why people fail and how you can maximise your chances of not giving up by February.

Most common New Year’s resolutions

According to a recent ComRes poll, the most common New Year’s resolutions include:

  1. Exercise more (38 per cent)
  2. Lose weight (33 per cent)
  3. Eat more healthily (32 per cent)
  4. Take a more active approach to health (15 per cent) =
  5. Learn new skill or hobby (15 per cent) =
  6. Spend more time on personal wellbeing (12 per cent) =
  7. Spend more time with family and friends (12 per cent) =
  8. Drink less alcohol (12 per cent) =
  9. Stop smoking (9 per cent)
  10. Other (1 per cent)

Why do people fail at New Year’s resolutions?

A poll of 2,000 British people, published by Bupa, found that of those who said they would be setting a New Year’s resolution for 2017, half were not confident they would stick to it.

In a bid to counter this trend, 52 per cent said that setting small, more achievable goals will help them stick to their New Year’s resolution.

Around one in five people also admitted to setting overly ambitious, potentially unsustainable goals. More women (58 per cent) than men (45 per cent) say setting smaller and realistic goals will help them keep their New Year’s resolutions, while more men (26 per cent) than women (21 per cent) say technology is the key to helping them keep their goals on track. (ComRes. 2015)

How can I achieve my New Year’s resolutions?

At the start of every New Year, many people set new goals but only a few actually go on to achieve these.

According to Philip Clarke (2017), psychology lecturer at the University of Derby Online Learning, the biggest mistake is that many people identify what they want to achieve but do not think about how to do it.

He said: “They set long-term outcome goals such as getting a ‘dream body’ or to spend more time with family and, as a starting point, these sound like good goals. The problem is that the goal-setting process for many people stops there.

“People who develop action plans experience less anxiety, more confidence, improved concentration and greater satisfaction about achieving their goals and are more likely to succeed”.

The use of S.M.A.R.T. goals and FITT principles

What does a smart fitness goal stand for?

If you’re really serious about achieving your goals, make them SMART.S.M.A.R.T. is an acronym that stands for specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and timely (there are many more acronym that are used as well)

What is the FITT principle of training?

 The FITT Principle (or formula) is a great way of monitoring your exercise program. The acronym FITT outlines the key components of an effective exercise program, and the initials F, I, T, T, stand for: Frequency, Intensity, Time and Type.

As a trainer/coach I provide a number of sessions throughout Essex and East London. In order to help people to achieve their S.M.A.R.T. goals and FITT Principles, I aim to provide sessions that are energetic and motivational derived from my knowledge and passion for health and fitness as a personal trainer. I take a lot of pride in my work; seeing people achieve their goals and knowing I played a part in their fitness journey is the most rewarding part of my job. My classes are a great way to socialise with like-minded people, motivate each other and build up your self-confidence.

We train hard and we get results so come down to one of my session as listed below.

Day/Time – Monday’s 7 pm

Session – Run Club East (open to all abilities, mixed group)

Location – Bag drop outside as Nature Intended, Westfield Stratford

Price – FREE

 

Day/Time – Wednesday’s 5.45 pm – 6.45 pm & 6.45 pm – 7.45 pm

Session – Get Lean with Dean HIIT Session (open to all abilities, mixed group)

Location – Harford Health Centre, 115 Harford St, London E1 4FG

Price – £5 per Session

 

Day/Time – Thursday’s 6.45 pm – 7.45 pm

Session – Get Lean with Dean HIIT Session (open to all abilities, mixed group)Location – XX Place Health Centre, Mile End Hospital Site Bancroft Road London, E1 4DG

Price – £5 per Session

 

Day/Time – Sunday – 8.30 am – 9.30 am

Session – Active Park Bootcamp (open to all abilities, mixed group)

Location – Meeting the outdoor gym in Valentine’s Park, Ilford

Price – First session is FREE, £5 per Session afterwards, 10 sessions for £40

 

Day/Time – Sunday – 10.00 am – 11.00 am

Session – Active Park Bootcamp (open to all abilities, mixed group)

Location – Meeting the outdoor gym in Clayhall Park, Ilford

Price – First session is FREE, £5 per Session afterwards, 10 sessions for £40

There will be more sessions starting up soon, but if you like a session near you please get in touch.

 

Reference

Clarke, P. (2017). How to set New Year’s resolutions in 2017 and stick to them. Available: http://www.derby.ac.uk/blog/2017/01/set-new-years-resolutions-2017-stick/.

ComRes. 2015. BUPA – New Year’s Resolutions. [ONLINE] Available at:http://www.comresglobal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/BUPA_NY-Resolution_Public-Polling_Nov-15_UPDATED-TABLES.pdf.